Tag Archives: History

A Few Strange New Hybridities in Literature

Of late, my rather strange and serpentine reading habits have yielded up examples of what might be called literary hybridities, where genres and styles work to subsume or coalesce. Of course, such genre bending is not even remotely new but … Continue reading

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Michael Howard on Skylight Press

Michael Howard is an Anglo-Irish writer, historical researcher and editor. His work has become well-known and much respected after some 38 books on witchcraft, paganism and western occultism, including various tomes on the Norse-Germanic runes, folk traditions, angelic magic, faery … Continue reading

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De-fleshing out Characters in the Modern Novel

As we live in an age where we are producing novels and stories en masse it would seem that we should be somewhere near to perfecting the art of characterization in our fictions. Any writer worth their salt will know … Continue reading

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The Lost Art of Potato Breeding by Rebsie Fairholm

Ever wondered why supermarket potatoes are so bland and boring? In the Andes, where potatoes originate, there are thousands of varieties with bright colours, beautiful markings, unusual shapes and variations of flavour and cooking quality. In the modern world, industrialised … Continue reading

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Before the Dawn by Rupert Copping

In the beginning, the elders told him, there was neither light nor darkness, because in the beginning nothing existed. But then, for reasons that were unclear, the Holy Source had awakened like a person from sleep. When the Holy Source … Continue reading

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Christ and Qabalah by Gareth Knight and Anthony Duncan

Me Myself (of which I make so great a fuss) is a mere, brittle spike of consciousness on the circumference of being; a tiny terminal of an unplumbed depth. This opening stanza, read in the quiet nave of an old … Continue reading

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Writing the Unicorn: The Paradox of Historical Fiction

“Luckily Nicolas didn’t have to answer, as he couldn’t have spoken. I had placed my hand on his bulge, which was as hard as a tree branch. I had never touched one before.” It was at that precise point when … Continue reading

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